Your source for daily hacks

Published on: September 22, 2013 / Comments: 2

Lazy Sunday Links – 9/22/2013

It’s Sunday again, time to take a break from watching your favorite NFL team lose and learn something somewhat productive.

First up, you should fire up your 3D Printer and make yourself a set of these cool 8bit video game coasters.

Not in the mood for some video game coasters? Well did you know there are more places to get 3D models to print for your 3D Printer other than Thingiverse ?  There’s Defcad which commonly has all those items that people are forced to take down other places, and Yeggi which seems to just scour the web hunting models.  If you are making industrial designs like PCB layout, there’s 3dcontentcentral.  That should get you going.

You’ve obviously heard of FFT or Fast Fourier Transform, you have it on your trusty O’Scope and when you look at it, you think you see valuable information.  But what exactly is a Fourier Transform?  Check out the interactive guide to Fourier Transform so you can learn something.

Looking for somewhere to host your software project, not a fan of GitHub?  Srchub is just starting out, but offers subversion, git, mercurial, wiki, issue tracker.  Lets you assign multiple collaborators and also make private repositories.  Not a bad gig for free.

You JavaScript/Node.js guys have probably seen the Espruino microcontroller.  A micro that can be developed using JavaScript.  But did you know there is another one ?  The Tessel.  This one’s got on-board wi-fi.

Published on: August 20, 2013 / Comments: None

Nintendo audio played in real time by robotic musicians

I just want to start out by saying I love this hack.  With that out of the way…  What we have here is some Raspberry Pi’s and someone’s amazing vision.  First off introducing the band.  The player piano has been converted to run off of MIDI.  The two percussion instruments are solenoids controlled by a Raspberry Pi.

Next we have (I believe) a Raspberry Pi feeding off of the audio coming out of an original NES, and translating the notes into MIDI notes and percussion instructions.  There is a slight delay (due to the translation I suppose) and you can see it but it’s not that bad all the time.  This all comes together having a nice robotic symphony playing your music while you game on.

I would love to re-create this hack, the percussion stuff seems pretty straight forward, but where am I going to find a player piano at a decent price ?

Published on: August 3, 2013 / Comments: None

The smallest chiptunes player you will ever see – the noiseplug

So small the entire thing fits _inside_ an RCA jack, Joachim has managed to write some really cool tight looped code.  On an Atmel ATtiny9, which only has 1K of flash and 32 bytes of ram he managed to make some sweet chiptune bliss.

It actually doesn’t sound that bad either!  He’s got the source code to the ATtiny9 right here on github.  He also has the source to his prototype of the same code for windows.  Good stuff.