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Published on: September 10, 2013 / Comments: 1

Amazing Nintendo Nixie clock sporting retropie

Bradley does some amazing work. Usually it’s in the form of replica light sabers and what not. This time he was commissioned to a NES inspired nixie clock for a wedding gift, but decided why stop there ? Let’s make it an actual playable NES.

Inside on the clock side is an Arduino Uno with a ArduiNIX Nixie Tube Driver shield + Nixie tubes. On the gaming side is your usually Raspberry Pi running Retropie distro. Controllers are NES style usb controllers, and a RGB led provides mood setting. This is all wrapped in a lovely custom wood enclosure painted to look like a real NES. He’s even put real NES start / reset buttons in there.

Man that’s a site to make anyone envious! More pictures and info can be found on Bradley’s site.

Published on: September 3, 2013 / Comments: 1

SNESoIP puts your controller on the net

The project it currently in its early stage, but fully functional and could be used to play multiplayer games over the Internet.
The sheer fact that people seem to spend a great deal of time modernizing vintage consoles tells you one thing, that retro gaming is awesome.  The SNESoIP project is not a full solution for playing SNES games (on a real console I might add, not an emulator) over the internet, but it is a start.

The concept here is to basically move the controllers to a packet format that can be manipulated over networking.  On the hardware side, it’s basically a box with an ethernet cable and a SNES controller jack.  It looks like the processor is an ATmega8 with an enc28j60 for ethernet (which was mentioned earlier as a cheap Arduino solution).

The project is open source, has source code, schematic, and pcb files here on github.

Published on: August 20, 2013 / Comments: None

Nintendo audio played in real time by robotic musicians

I just want to start out by saying I love this hack.  With that out of the way…  What we have here is some Raspberry Pi’s and someone’s amazing vision.  First off introducing the band.  The player piano has been converted to run off of MIDI.  The two percussion instruments are solenoids controlled by a Raspberry Pi.

Next we have (I believe) a Raspberry Pi feeding off of the audio coming out of an original NES, and translating the notes into MIDI notes and percussion instructions.  There is a slight delay (due to the translation I suppose) and you can see it but it’s not that bad all the time.  This all comes together having a nice robotic symphony playing your music while you game on.

I would love to re-create this hack, the percussion stuff seems pretty straight forward, but where am I going to find a player piano at a decent price ?

Published on: August 19, 2013 / Comments: None

A Gameboy emulator running on the ChromeCast

What I find really funny about new hardware coming out is people generally do three things first.  First they try to root or jailbreak it.  Second they try to put Linux on it.  And the very next thing they do is port emulators to it.  Following in succession here’s a Gameboy emulator running on the Google ChromeCast.

While it’s not the craziest hack, the ChromeCast is hot now and this is just a foresight of what’s to come.  It’s a port of JSGB, a Gameboy emulator running in JavaScript.

Source code and instructions available here.

Published on: August 8, 2013 / Comments: None

Millennium 64 and N64 Pi!

This is the kind of stuff that I really like to see.   Baka Chan is my type of hacker.  Here is his build log of taking the guts from a Nintendo 64, and sticking it in a Millennium Falcon.  It’s not as easy as you would think, just taking the guts and tossing it in another.  You have to  finesse  things, plan it out, and extend a lot of wiring!

So here’s the kicker.  Why go through the trouble of putting the guts in a Millennium Falcon ? (Besides the obvious answer that it’s awesome).  Well because you have one left over from putting a Raspberry Pi inside a N64 case of course silly!   Not the cleanest stuff job I’ve seen, but it works.  Bravo Baka Chan keep ‘em coming.